upstairs

Slightly extravagant guest closet makeover

guest closet makeover

Yes, I fully comprehend that chandeliers in closets are completely unnecessary.  Some might say extravagant.  I don't care.

Our upstairs is one of the few places in our house that's almost completely renovated, save a few little details.  One of those details was the ugly yellow closet with an outdated 1970's light fixture, painted shelves, metal rod and broken bi-fold door.

I figured it would be an easy weekend project to replace the door and spruce it up.  As usual, I was wrong!  The entire project ended up taking about three weekends, but it was too much fun to quit with a new rod and door.

Hanging the solid wood door was a challenge and that was just the start.  I also painted the walls and trim, hung a small chandelier, had new shelves cut at Home Depot and covered them with spray glue and wallpaper, installed a new rod... and finally... added the cherry on top with an antique crystal doorknob from Ricca's.

The changes brighten up our tiny closet so much.  I hope it'll be a sparkling little treat for our guests for years to come!

Blow-In Attic Insulation: READ BEFORE YOU DIY!

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Me and the love of my life, the Meyer Model 220 The upstairs of our house has always been terribly hot and a quick peek inside our upper attic explained why.  It barely had any insulation... and between some rafters... it didn't have any at all!  After getting a few astronomical quotes, we decided to tackle the project ourselves.  Of course, Joe decided this on the hottest day of the year.  Fun!

When you buy the eco-friendly cellulose fiber blow-in insulation from Home Depot, they loan you the blower.  I AM WARNING YOU NOW.  WALK AWAY FROM THE BLOWER!!

Unfortunately we didn't do that.

Now may be the time to remind you that it was noon... on the hottest day of the year.  After lugging the machine up to our lower roof and setting everything up, we spent hours upon hours upon hours battling the damn thing.  No matter what we tried, it just wouldn't blow out fast enough.

So we gave up, returned it to Home Depot and got a new one.  With high hopes, we lugged the machine BACK up to our lower roof, set everything BACK up and spent even longer battling the damn thing.  No matter what we tried, it still wouldn't blow out fast enough.

In an effort to save our sanity and marriage, we quit.

A few weekends later with cooler weather and calmer nerves, we rented a professional unit from Sunbelt.  It's called the Meyer Model 220 and it's MAGIC!  It's AMAZING!  It's INCREDIBLE!  It was strong enough to use on the ground, it was easier to operate, and in 2 hours, we blew roughly 35 bags of insulation into the attic.  It took 2 days to blow in just 5 bags with the horrible Home Depot blowers!!!

Our upstairs is now cool, comfortable and more importantly, our marriage is still intact.

So, if you'd like to try it yourself (which I highly recommend), here are a few tips...

  • Make sure your hoses are clamped nice and tight.
  • Give the machine some time to warm up and only start with a handful of insulation.
  • Don't overfill the machine.  One bag at a time.
  • Break up the insulation a bit as you fill the machine.
  • Wear goggles and a mask!  If you're in the attic, wear a full respirator.
  • Avoid any sharp turns in the hose.
  • Fill to at least the top of the rafters, but feel free to add more.
  • Buy more insulation than you think you'll need.  It'll save you a trip to the store if you run out.
  • Start early and pick a cool day.
  • Lay a piece of wood across the rafters to lay on.
  • Wear a headlamp to see what you're doing.

 

Cellulose blow-in insulation in attic

Insulation selfie