shopping

Anthropologie everything.

Anthropologie Spring 2015 Draped Bijoux Chandelier

I'll never forget many, many Christmases ago, shopping with my best friend Liz.  She'd asked her entire family for Anthropologie gift cards... and they seriously delivered.

She was like a kid in a candy store!

Liz's obsession was my first glimpse into how great Anthropologie really is.  I've bought countless dresses for special occasions, tops, shoes, home decor... but I've never quite understood my fascination.

When I walk inside, the clothes never really seem to suit my style.  Yet somehow, I adore everything I've ever bought there.

And so it is with their home decor.

Flipping through the pages of Anthropologie's "HOUSE and HOME spring 2015" catalog, nothing seems quite my taste, yet I want every single thing inside.

Maybe it's the touch of whimsy I'm lacking in my life.  Maybe it's the unapologetic splashes of color.  Maybe it's sense of daring I secretly envy.

Who knows why I love it all so much, but I'm already filling up my wish list!

DIY Hydrangea Wreath

DIY Silk Hydrangea Wreath  

I decided to do something a little different for my grandmother for Christmas.  She had commented on a photo of a beautiful hydrangea wreath on my blog and I thought it would be fun to make one for her.  While she was in town for the holidays, we picked out the flowers and ribbon at Hobby Lobby and then I got to work!  I couldn't be easier to put this wreath together.  You'll need 7-8 large silk hydrangeas, wired ribbon, a wreath base, hot glue, scissors, wire cutters and wire.

  1. Lay out your basic design on the wreath to determine placement.
  2. Cut the stems off of your flowers using scissors or wire cutters.  Make sure you save the leaves and don't cut so close to the bloom that it falls apart.
  3. Hot glue your leaves onto your wreath base in a sporadic, but balanced pattern
  4. Hot glue your hydrangea blooms over the leaves in whatever color pattern you'd like.  Make sure they've evenly spaced and you leave room for the bow.
  5. Create a bow with wire or purchase one that's pre-made.   Leave "tails" that are roughly 2 feet long
  6. Hot glue your bow to the empty space on your wreath.
  7. Wrap the ribbon around the hydrangea blooms and secure with dots of hot glue.
  8. Trim the ends of your ribbon.
  9. C'est fini!

 

A taste of historic New Orleans for your Christmas wish list

Luxury, Inequity & Yellow Fever: Living Legacies and the Story of Old New Orleans You don't have to live in New Orleans to get a bit of the Big Easy under your Christmas tree.  Check out this gorgeous new book from the folks who run the historic Hermann-Grima and Gallier properties!

Photographer and author Kerri McCaffety recounts the days of antebellum New Orleans through glossy photos and some pretty scandalous accounts.  You may recognize her photography from one of my other favorite books... Bryan Batt's Big, Easy Style (yes, THAT Bryan Batt).

Luxury, Inequity & Yellow Fever explores the worlds of those who lived in the noteworthy Hermann-Grima and Gallier homes, including the founding families, enslaved workers, Free People of Color craftsmen, ladies of The Christian Woman’s Exchange and residents of the 20th century rooming house... as well as the staff who keep the properties running today.

If you want a peek inside what life was like for the wealthiest families of the 19th century living in New Orleans' French Quarter, this is it!

Luxury, Inequity & Yellow Fever retails for $45 and is available at bookstores throughout New Orleans, at the Hermann-Grima gift shop, online at Barnes and Noble and on the Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses website.

 

Background:

Built in 1831 by Samuel Hermann, a German-Jewish immigrant who quickly amassed (and lost) his fortune in the commodities market, the Hermann-Grima House, located at 820 Saint Louis Street, is one of the most significant residences in New Orleans. Generations of New Orleans’ notable Grima family resided on the property from the 1840s until the 1920s.

The Gallier House at 1132 Royal Street was designed and built in 1857 by James Gallier, Jr., one of the most prominent architects of 19th century New Orleans.

The Woman’s Exchange purchased the Hermann-Grima House in 1924 and acquired the Gallier House in 1996. Their mission is to continue the legacy of the Christian Woman’s Exchange, established in 1881, by restoring and maintaining the houses, and interpreting their contribution to and place in New Orleans.

Framed Maps Add Vintage Touch

Vintage maps The way I rave about Fine Art America, you'd think I owned stock in the company.  It's an online database of THOUSANDS of prints... of you guessed it... fine art!  What's cool is that you can find anything from John James Audubon's famous sketches to up and coming modern oil paintings and have them printed any way you'd like.  They offer canvas prints, art prints, acrylic prints, metal prints, greeting cards, even matting and framing.

I purchased the safari-inspired prints for Beau's nursery from their website and recently ordered two prints of antique New Orleans maps to add to our guest bedroom.

To cut down on costs, I bought a pre-made frame, then got the glass and mat cut at the frame shop and had them assemble everything.  The overall size is 24"X30" and with the cost of the framing and prints, each piece came out to only $100 ($200 for the pair).  I love the finished product more than I ever predicted and saved a ton of money doing them this way!  Our British Colonial-inspired guest room is now almost complete.  We just need to change out the light fixture and finish the burlap curtains.  I can't wait to show you the finished result!!

Whole Foods Goes All-American

20140701-141241-51161421.jpg You never know where you'll find inspiration and I certainly don't expect it at the grocery store, but Whole Foods Market had such a cute idea, I had to share it! Interspersed between flags, watermelons and 12-packs of Pabst Blue Ribbon beer, the store is adorned with these darling wood pallets for the upcoming 4th of July weekend.

They're painted very simply like the American flag, then lightly sanded for a vintage appeal. They have a big impact and if you could scrounge up some free pallets from a local grocery or big box store, they'd cost next to nothing to make!

I'm definitely going to try the project for myself.

Wood pallet flag at Whole Foods

Wood pallet flag at Whole Foods